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Getting Help With: Out of hours & Emergencies

Christmas period opening times

To be published nearer to the time.

Local pharmacies

Your local pharmacy will be able to provide you with advice and medication to help relieve the symptoms of common ailments. You can find your local pharmacy on the NHS website.

When the GP practice is closed

If you need medical help fast but it’s not an emergency call 111, if it’s a life-threatening emergency call 999.

NHS 111 is the number to call when you need medical help fast but it’s not a life-threatening emergency. Calls to 111 are FREE from landlines and mobiles and are available 24/7, every day of the year.

When to call 111:

  • You think you need to go to A&E but it’s not a critical emergency
  • Your GP surgery is closed and you need healthcare advice
  • You don’t know who to call for medical help

When to call 999:

  • Major accident or trauma
  • Severe breathlessness
  • Severe bleeding
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Severe chest pain

Urgent Treatment centres

Urgent treatment centres are usually staffed by nurses. If you need one, you can often get tests like an ECG (electrocardiogram), blood tests or an X-ray.

They can help with things like: 

  • sprains and strains
  • suspected broken bones
  • injuries, cuts and bruises
  • stomach pain, vomiting and diarrhoea 
  • skin infections and rashes
  • high temperature in children and adults
  • mental health concerns

If you need a prescription one can be organised for you. Emergency contraception is also available.

Our nearest Urgent Treatment Centre is at the North Tyneside General Hospital:
North Tyneside General Hospital,
Rake Lane,
North Shields,
Tyne & Wear,
NE29 8NH

ACCIDENT AND EMERGENCY

A&E (accident and emergency) is for serious injuries and life-threatening emergencies only. It is also known as the emergency department or casualty.

Life-threatening emergencies are different for adults and children.

Adults – call 999 or go to A&E now for any of the below:

  • signs of a heart attack
    chest pain, pressure, heaviness, tightness or squeezing across the chest
  • signs of a stroke
    face dropping on one side, cannot hold both arms up, difficulty speaking
  • sudden confusion (delirium)
    cannot be sure of own name or age
  • suicide attempt
    by taking something or self-harming 
  • severe difficulty breathing
    not being able to get words out, choking or gasping
  • choking
    on liquids or solids right now
  • heavy bleeding
    spraying, pouring or enough to make a puddle
  • severe injuries
    after a serious accident or assault
  • seizure (fit)
    shaking or jerking because of a fit, or unconscious (cannot be woken up)
  • sudden, rapid swelling
    of the lips, mouth, throat or tongue

British Sign Language (BSL) speakers can make a BSL video call to 999.

Deaf people can use 18000 to contact 999 using text relay.

Children – call 999 or go to A&E now for any of the below:

  • seizure (fit)
    shaking or jerking because of a fit, or unconscious (cannot be woken up)
  • choking
    on liquids or solids now
  • difficulty breathing
    making grunting noises or sucking their stomach in under their ribcage
  • unable to stay awake
    cannot keep their eyes open for more than a few seconds
  • blue, grey, pale or blotchy skin, tongue or lips
    on brown or black skin, grey or blue palms or soles of the feet
  • limp and floppy
    their head falls to the side, backwards or forwards
  • heavy bleeding
    spraying, pouring or enough to make a puddle
  • severe injuries
    after a serious accident or assault
  • signs of a stroke
    face dropping on one side, cannot hold both arms up, difficulty speaking
  • sudden rapid swelling
    of the lips, mouth, throat or tongue
  • sudden confusion
    agitation, odd behaviour or non-stop crying

British Sign Language (BSL) speakers can make a BSL video call to 999.

Deaf people can use 18000 to contact 999 using text relay.

When you’re not sure what to do, NHS 111 can help. If you need to go to A&E, NHS 111 can book an arrival time so they know you are coming. An arrival time is not an appointment but helps to avoid overcrowding. 

Check your symptoms on 111 online, or call 111 to speak to someone if you need help for a child under 5.

Our nearest A&E is Northumbria Specialist Emergency Care Hospital (NSECH):

Northumbria Way
Cramlington
Northumberland
NE23 6NZ

Park Parade

Contact

Park Parade Surgery
69 Park Parade
Whitley Bay, NE26 1DU

Northumbria Primary Care